ronracer:

whowasntthere:

azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.

What a beautiful photoset of women. Women we don’t often see portrayed in the media, but these are, indeed, women — just as grey-haired men are men.

Silver foxes!

(Source: violenceandscience, via connoririshwright)

lol @ the decline in the commentary q

Anonymous asked:

hello how is life treating you my talented friend? :)

heysomeday Answer:

idk how to answer this question!! kind of simultaneously really horrible and really great haha. literally and without exaggeration some of the very worst and very best things to happen to me have happened lately. i dont really know what else to say, i dont want to go into a lot of detail at the moment i guess. i appreciate your concern nice anon i just always feel like im giving you bad news and stuff :/ but thank you also :) 

asks anon personal

"

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

Even when I was explicitly trying, I still failed to have the discussion participants fairly represent the population of the students in my classroom.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it’s called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are ‘hogging the floor’ even when men are dominating.

"
-

Stop interrupting me: gender, conversation dominance and listener bias, by Jessica Kirkpatrick from Women In Astronomy

Implicit bias is a thing, just like privilege. Calling it out isn’t meant to shame anyone, but to alert us to step it up and improve ourselves so everyone can have a voice. Be conscious of what you and others are saying, and know when not to speak.

(via hciwrc)

(Source: itsawomansworld2, via porcelain-horse-horselain)

important

jainz:

Woman speaks out against misogynistic abuse and is met with misogynistic abuse from men who believe misogynistic abuse doesn’t exist and that she should stop making them look bad.

(via albinwonderland)